My Instant Photos

All photos taken with a Polaroid 250 Automatic Land Camera
Amoeba Music, San Francisco, CA

Amoeba Music, San Francisco, CA

Chinatown, San Francisco, CA

Chinatown, San Francisco, CA

Mel’s Diner - Geary Blvd, San Francisco, CA ‎

Mel’s Diner - Geary Blvd, San Francisco, CA

San Fransisco, CA

San Fransisco, CA

Pier 39, San Francisco, CA

Pier 39, San Francisco, CA

theheartstrong asked: what's your view on the instax?? i like it for now (mostly being drunk with friends) but i'm thinking about getting a real polaroid. do you think polaroid cameras/film are far superior in quality?

Polaroid and Instax film develop differently and of course use different chemicals. Polaroid integral film develops from the front, which is why all the cameras need mirrors and are much larger. Even the films color chemicals are stacked differently so Instax develops the blue first and Polaroid the red, so you have different looks to each film. The real problem with Instax is the Fuji cameras are all crap, except the 500AF. They don’t let you turn off the flash and the plastic lenses don’t help. With Polaroid you get a wide range of high quality cameras, and even more crappy ones. The Automatic Land cameras like the 180, 185, 190 and 195 all have fully manual controls with fantastic lenses. And the 600SE is even better and you can even get Polaroid backs for Hasselblads. But even a 20 dollar Automatic Land at a flea market will be much better then an Instax camera. The key is to do your research and see which cameras have glass lenses. Of course the Polaroids are much bigger and need to be handled delicately, not good for getting drunk with friends. So its really up to what you are doing and what you prefer.

To address the price comment: The Instax film is significantly cheaper then the Impossible Project’s, but the Fuji packfilm film is about the same price. You also have to take into consideration that the Instax cameras are $60-$100 while a Polaroid camera can be had for a few bucks.

Anonymous asked: Hey, do you know if a polaroid Swinger II Land camera takes fuji 100c and 3000b? I'm not sure whether to buy it or not, in case the film isn't available :s (thanks!)

Unfortunately this camera uses rollfilm, which hasn’t been made since 1991. What you’re looking for is a packfilm camera. The Optional Land List gives a great comparison of all the packfilm cameras here. It shows the difference between each model (lens type, finder type, plastic/metal, etc). His other list here will tell you production years and even the original price of each camera. Any camera in these sections of the website will use the FP-100c and FP-3000b, if it has the shutter speed for it. Its definitely worth it to check out the rest of his website as he has information on all the other Polaroid camera types and builds on rollfilm cameras he has converted to packfilm.

Alcatraz Island, San Francisco, CA

Alcatraz Island, San Francisco, CA

17 Mile Drive, Pebble Beach, CA

17 Mile Drive, Pebble Beach, CA

bulbasaurio asked: When I first got my camera (christmas gift from a friend) it had a couple prints in it so I've been savoring them. Now I want to buy new film (I already checked out your blog and learned I need 600 film and I can buy it from the impossible project) now I was wondering if I need a dark room to insert the film...? Or how does that work?

Polaroid’s whole philosophy was for the instant, easy picture. It wouldn’t be very easy if every person who owned a Polaroid also needed a darkroom! Even when loading and unloading 35mm film you don’t need a dark room. The guys at the Film Photography Project have many videos on how to use all the different Polaroid camera series, but the video that is most relevant to you is this one. But also be sure to check out their other videos. In short, all you have to do is take the film cartridge out of the box and wrapper, slide it into the camera and close it up, then you are all set! They explain all this and more in the video, happy shooting!

17-Mile Drive, Pebble Beach, CA

17-Mile Drive, Pebble Beach, CA

Double exposure of a sign under Fisherman’s Wharf in Monterey, and then the rocky beach opposite it

Double exposure of a sign under Fisherman’s Wharf in Monterey, and then the rocky beach opposite it

Fisherman’s Wharf, Monterey Bay, CA

Fisherman’s Wharf, Monterey Bay, CA

Anonymous asked: How is your depth of field so small?

It’s from the Polaroid Close-Up Kit 473 lens.